Friday, September 30, 2011

More Bloffee? Allow me...

Welcome everybody to Friday Morning Follower’sBloffee!  -A way to meet new people and up your followers during your normal friday morning rituals.  Place your breakfast contribution on the counter and settle in!

 All you have to do to participate is 1.  Comment. 
2. Tell me what you’ve brought for morning bloffee.  (Today I’ve started out with coffee and English muffins dripping with butter.  Mmm.) 

3. Click on someone you don’t know in the comments section and check out their blog!  Voila- a new friend and potential follower connection has been made!

In the meantime I’ll be available for chat in the comments section.  The winner of this Banned Book Week’s novel ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ is:  Jennifer Hillier!  Congrats Jennifer!  Please be sure to send your mailing address to katiemills18@hotmail.com.

In other news- what did you guys blog about this week?  I know one blog post that caught a lot of attention was the ebookexperiment by Shelli Johannes Wells. – thus leading me to this week’s topic of bloffee conversation:  Have you guys noticed a definite shift in mentality when it comes to self ebook publishing these last few months?  I know in my mind, self publishing has almost completely lost its taboo connotations.  And I think it can definitely work out in some author’s favor if the circumstances are right.  To be truthful, after years spent in the query trenches, self publishing is looking very tempting and I’m definitely gathering information and keeping an eye on Shelli’s ebook experiment. 

That said- I have to wonder WHY traditional and self publishing are being compared like they’re in some kind of competition. Why must one win the other over?   Isn’t there room for both?

Any other big themes you noticed around the blogosphere this week?  Be sure to pass the orange juice and have a great weekend everyone!:)

*CQG*

48 comments:

Will Burke said...

Just coffee this morning, with some scratchings for the cat who lives in my basement (she's shy, not quarentined).
Another option is to Podcast your book. Yet another option is to self-publish derivitive short stories. I haven't experimented with this, but have heard of it being done.

Dianne K. Salerni said...

After the week I've had -- and knowing I'm facing a difficult faculty meeting first thing this morning -- I'm bringing Mimosas. Help yourself, everyone!

I agree -- there is room for all kinds of publishing. But there is a massive build up of prejudice against self-publishing, due to the sheer number of writers publishing books that are not really ready for publication. However, the beauty of ebooks is that you can usually sample them first -- and that way avoid buying a book by a writer who doesn't know what verb tense he's writing in or who hasn't properly edited her book for grammar and spelling.

And that's a good lesson for authors considering e-publishing. Allow readers to sample a good, healthy chunk of your book, so the readers feel secure buying it.

Sandra Ulbrich Almazan said...

*yawn* It's too early to eat (plus I still have to take my medicine), so I'll put the kettle on for some tea. Something warm is needed on a windy morning like this one.

Regarding the difference between traditional and indie publishing, from the business aspect, indie publishing is much better for the author. It's not just about money; it's about the contracts too. I recommend Kristine Kathryn Rusch's blog The Business Rusch to all authors.

Clarissa Draper said...

Morning, I have brought coffee and an east Indian treat.

I have noticed a shift in the view of self-pub. You're right, the bad name is gone. I'm happy about that. It' gives more writers the chance to have their work out there. It's less money now then the traditional route (although, even the big 6 are not offering the big bucks no more).

Great post.

Stina Lindenblatt said...

Shelli and I had a conversation about her so called experiment. It's not an experiment. It's nothing but a clever twist on marketing. And now she recruiting 50 people for a Blog Tour (because in reality, that's exactly what the current phase of the "experiment" is--recruiting people to talk about her book online). Her experiment will work because people will be curious about it. Had she just announced she was self publishing her book, her followers might not have been so excited to support her.

Because a number of my friends write romance, epublishing isn't a new concept to me. BUT I have notice a number of YA writers this week jumping onto the self publishing bandwagon. And they are all scrambling to figure out how to market themselves (like Shelli did). Meanwhile, the rest of us will be watching to see what happens.

Trisha Leaver said...

I brought chocolate covered expresso beans because which I am currently eating by the handful. Hmm . . . self-publishing is the topic of conversation I see. I understand it's appeal and think for some individuals it is a viable and profitable route. But it's not for me; I am more the traditional route type of gal.

Jen Daiker said...

Good morning Bloffee people! I've come with apple cider pancakes (Pinterest just whipped up this recipe and I had to share)!

I know everyone here so far, but I'll come back later to click on someone I don't know, as reqeusted :D

I blogged about conversations with the hubby, querying, working with or without agents (and learning not to judge). It's been a great week of reading blogs too!

The self-publishing is being accepted more now than ever! I'm glad to see more and more people are taking that route and finding their voice! I love how confident and strong these individuals are! They give me strenght to keep pushing!

Old Kitty said...

Ooops - I've just eaten the last danish...!

Anyway! I think there's room for all sorts of ways to be published - especially now with Amazon upping the ante with its innovations!!

Take care
x

Creepy Query Girl said...

My midafternoon tea is actually cooling as we speak:) Trisha- don't forget to share those chocolate covered espresso beans! lol. Stina- I know the experiment is a part of her marketing- isn't she a marketing major? In any case, it's a great way to get word out about her book but I'm also really curious to see the ins and outs of what goes on behind the scenes.

Creepy Query Girl said...

Good advice Dianne!

Jennifer Shirk said...

Morning!
I saw that the Trident agency is helping their authors edit, design covers etc..for their clients who want to self-publish. So the times are changing and I don't see why both (tradtional and self-oub)can't exist together nicely.

Creepy Query Girl said...

From what I can see agents seem to be taking the high road and honestly advising their clients to do what's right for their careers and not necessarily for the agent's pockets which I find admirable. And if they can find a common ground- like an agency who also does epubbing, that sounds fair.

Kelly Polark said...

Good morning! I brought chocolate milk, because I don't drink coffee...

And yes, I think there is definitely room for self and traditionally pubbed books!

Wendy L. Callahan said...

Well, let's see... Breakfast was hours ago for me, but I'm glad to share the Frankenberry cereal. Hey, it's almost Halloween - we had to stock up on the monster cereals.

I've been pondering the traditional "versus" self-publishing question as well. There are pros and cons to both and, like the mommy wars (SAHM vs. working), I say that it's all about doing what is right for YOU as an author. Simple as that. :)

Em-Musing said...

Morning...strong, black Trader Joe's coffee for me this A.M. I shifted at the RWA conference in NYC. I was an avid "Self publishing is for those who aren't 'real' authors mindset." Well...I got knocked down by the wave of praise for self pub and learned it's a viable option.

salarsenッ said...

I agree. I think ebooks are gaining more respect every day. The publishing industry is a living, breathing entity, just like our stories should be. It's constantly evolving to fit into our changing world. Readers are intelligent, and so are writers. Things are a'changin'...

Gina said...

If brunch (blunch?) items are acceptable, I can offer spinach and mozzarella quiche, mmmm.

I've also noticed self-pubbing got a lot of attention this week, and I read that some agencies are considering having a self-publishing arm for books that go out on sub but don't sell. Interesting.

Over at my blog, I talked about my love of reading causing me to be extremely rude at a family picnic, and also my very first rejection on a full. I love visitors, so come on over! (I love food too, so leftover bloffee items are welcome.)

Haven said...

Hello hello! This is my first Friday morning bloffee. I'm starting the day with blueberry Chobani greek yogurt and green tea. Would anyone like a cup?

I have to admit, I didn't realize there was a taboo with self publishing. I guess I just always figured it was too expensive. Ebooks are definitely becoming big now and that's giong to change the way media is handled, making it easier to get ideas out there. Still, I prefer having a nice solid book in my hand with pages I can turn.

Ashley said...

How about some warm gooey cinnamon rolls!

I think it's great to have choices when it comes to publishing. The world's big enough for both types. Now this is where we all sing kumbaya.

Linda Kage said...

I'm brining Cocoa puffs and Strawberry milk to the bloffee table today! Yeah, yeah, I'm over thirty.

Congrats to the Dorian Gray winner. I blogged about writing newsletters. Needed some expert advice from readers!

Happy Friday!

Deborah Jackson said...

Cherry cheese danish, anyone? And a big frothing cup of cappuccino.

I think self-pub is a viable route, but, having recently read a few, I have to add to Diane's comment about books not being ready for publication. It's more than just copyediting issues. Some of these books have not been critiqued or gone through any developmental editing process. A writer can't just crank out a first draft and expect it to be phenomenal. It might sell a few copies through the author's promotional platform, but the author can't expect to generate a following if the initial effort isn't made.

What I also worry about is that readers' expectations will be coloured by those authors who don't spend the time and work up the virtual sweat to make the book a worthwhile read.

Creepy Query Girl said...

Welcome Haven!

I agree that if you're going to go the self pub route- you should try and do it as professionally as possible and make a real excerpt available so people know what they're buying.

storyqueen said...

I only brought tea this morning. English tea.

(But there is a strudel from Trader Joe's baking in the oven!)

About self publishing--I don't think I'll ever be good enough to do it. I really rely on my editor!!

Shelley

Anne Gallagher said...

M&M's and a Coke for breakfast for me. I know, isn't it awful.

Having tried the traditional route and getting nowhere, I figured the only other way to go was self-pub. With Kindle, it's kind of a no-brainer now.

But as someone said above, you need as professional a book as possible to get noticed. From the cover to the formatting to the editing. Otherwise, it's just another book out of how many millions out there. You need to make sure it, and you, can be taken seriously.

Connie Keller said...

I've brought cold pizza. I know that it's not very breakfasty, but I love cold pizza for breakfast.

I've recently gone the indie self-pubbed route. And it's been a great experience. But it's also a lot of work. And since Amazon changed its website algorithms, it's a lot more work to get your book the publicity it needs.

There's no one answer for publishing--lots of people are doing both indie e-pubbing and traditional. No matter what you use it's a wild ride, and we all need each other's encouragement to help us over the rough patches.

Johanna Garth said...

Yum, I think I'll bring some bacon (sorry vegetarians) but it's the one breakfast item I can never pass up.

As for the publishing industry, I think this is an amazing time to be a writer. However the industry shakes out people will always want to read good books. Keep writing and your work will find an audience.

Tamara Narayan said...

I'm bringing whole grain Cheerios and Wegman's Cranberry/Grape Lite Juice. Aargh--old and on a low sodium/low sugar diet. Curse you kidney stones!

Whether an author self-pubs or goes the traditional route, everybody needs to find creative ways to market their books. Just the thought of it makes me queasy. Maybe the query process isn't so bad after all--relatively speaking.

Carolyn V said...

I'll bring veggie juice (so healthy, but an acquired taste I think).

I think the e-pub vs. traditional will always be controversial. But in my opinion, both good. ;)

Ru said...

Diet Coke and a muffin here.

Regarding traditional and e-publishing -- I went to a conference last weekend and I really thought some people were going to come to blows over the issue. I think e-publishing has lost a lot of the stigma, though the concerns about it (that there are a lot of people uploading work that isn't publishable generally) will always be there. It's really just a matter of waiting for cream to rise to the top.

Trisha Wolfe said...

I'm bringing chocolate today! It's needed. Trust me lol. Everyone have a great weekend!

Jenny said...

Greek yogurt and some half-caf for me, though I'd love one of the aforementioned frothing cappuccinos.

As a semi-creepy veteran of the query trenches, I'm glad to see the self-pub tides turning. Though perhaps that just makes me a quitter :-)

Happy Friday!

Elizabeth said...

I've got a pitcher of sweet tea and a turkey sammich. Yum.

The self-publishing thing--I don't think there's anything wrong with the act of self-publishing, but I don't think it's anything to rush into, either. For starters, I don't trust Amazon in the least. They are up to something. I can smell it.

Another thing is that there are already hundreds if not thousands of queries sent to agents every day by people who are nowhere near ready to query. I'm not talking about people who are querying and just not striking the right chord with agents. I'm talking me at fourteen, or you before you figured out that revising novels made them better or started reading writing blogs or even finished a novel. (Yes, you heard me, there are half-written novels on Amazon.) Now imagine all of those not-ready-to-be-queried queries as not-ready-to-be-published books available for download. Now imagine the kind of career the authors of those kinds of books will have in five years.

I don't say this to pee on self-published books or authors. Really, I don't. There are some deliciously wonderful self-published books out there, so obviously not everyone will fall into that category. But the majority will. So with that in mind, it bothers me that the only thing brought up in these kinds of conversations are royalty rates and Amanda Hocking and gatekeepers. The real conversation we need to be having, the real information we need to get out there, is:

how do you know when you're ready (both in skill level and in terms of the book itself) to compete on a professional level?

what are your plans for your career and how does self-publishing integrate into that?

what should you look out for in contracts, both in terms of traditional publishers (no-compete clauses, options, rights, etc.) and in terms of the End User Agreements of Amazon/Smashwords/et al.?

how do you write a business plan? a profit/loss statement? when should you cut your losses?

how do you manage a business? an LLC? a corporation?

what marketing/promotion is most effective? what isn't working? how long, when, and where should you market a book?

if I self-publish a book and my sales are abysmal, will this keep me from getting a traditional deal in the future?

I think maybe I'm being analytical to a fault, but the fact of the matter is, it's not as easy as point and click and upload and do a blog tour and watch the money roll in. Nowadays, you could sell as many copies as Amanda Hocking and still not get that kind of exposure, because she's already been there and done that and a self-published Kindle millionaire is no longer news.

I'm feeling long-winded and kind of unpopular right now, so I'm going to shut up and eat my sammich. But for those of you who have self-published or are considering self-publishing, now more than ever you need to study study study the business end of publishing. Find out why publishers choose their books, why they choose certain covers, where they're advertising and how much they're spending and how you can emulate that on a much, much tighter budget.

Because how well you publish--not write--will determine your career.

Janet Johnson said...

I'm bringing cinnamon swirl wheat bread. Yum.

I'm quite interested in the e-publishing experiment, too.

Susan Oloier said...

Okay, so I am totally late. I grabbed some donuts from the bakery on my way through cyber space.
I am definitely considering the path of self-publishing. I have had a horrid query experience in the past. I am working on getting all my manuscripts in tip-top shape before making any rash decisions.
I'll have to check out the e-publishing experiment.

Matthew MacNish said...

E/Self-Pubbing vs. Traditional has been the theme for a few weeks now.

Unfortunately, I already know everybody here.

I'm bringing vodka, because I need a drink.

Nicki Elson said...

Um, I'm still nursing my last cup o' Joe, so technically I qualify, yes? Bloffee is a great idea! I look forward to meeting someone new.

I have noticed the eBook vs. traditional pub thing seems to be a hot topic. I don't know why people have this natural tendency to want to pick a "team" and then smear the other team's face in the dirt. Both have good points, both have bad points, and yes, there's room for both. I agree w/ Elizabeth though, that the whole ePub thing can't possibly be as easy as some make it out to be.

Donna K. Weaver said...

What a fun idea. I'll share some yummy mint brownies.

*heads out to check some other blogs*

DL Hammons said...

I missed it again!!! Frack! And I had this lovely Snickers coffee from Mountain Mudd too. Plus I didn't win the drawing either. Double Frack!! *Hmph*

Lenny Lee* said...

hi miss katie! im getting here pretty late cause of school so im bringing some sweet stuff. im bringing some lemon tarts and some guava tarts. yummy for sure. :) for on my last post it bout forgeting to save my stuff i wrote. ack!
...hugs from lenny

Patty said...

I read 39 comments and now I forgot the question...
Coffee...pumpkin coffee and scrambled eggs with a bit of crumbled cheddar cheese and
A slice of whole wheat toast...
I blogged about a million different things this week...pumpkins and food and books and reviews...

julie fedderson said...

Hmmm. It's no longer morning, so I'm bringing a bottle of wine and some dark chocolate. I agree it's not a contest between self and traditional publishing. I admire the effort those folks who are doing self-pub make in terms of marketing and networking.

Dawn Kurtagich said...

Sorry I missed this yesterday, but this morning I bring with me coffee and cookie crunch cereal. Mmmmm.... :)

For me, self publishing can be an art. It is entrepreneurial and wonderful. That being said, I don't think it is quite for me. Maybe one day, but not right now.

Happy weekend, peeps!

Anne said...

Sorry, I didn't see this yesterday. But, had to go to work. I have often thought of the going the self publishing route, but it is too pricey a route for me.

Gail Shepherd said...

Yup, the taboo against self publishing seems to be eroding daily. I feel like I'm watching it happen in fast-motion. Weird. The question is, why? Because some writers are making such a success of it? This is fascinating to me.

Cynthia Lee said...

I'll bring a chocolate almond torte for breakfast because I love the smell of decadence in the morning. ;)

I don't get all the drama with trad vs. self-publishing. I think it's nice that there are more options than ever. *shrugs*

Marian Perera said...

I've seen far too many writers rush into publishing before their work is ready for public consumption. In one book I read, there was a reference to "pancakes and beacon", and that was the least of the mistakes. This can give self-publishing a stigma.

But I also think readers have their own methods for choosing what to read and buy when they're sifting through what is, in effect, the e-slushpile.

And I had a chicken salad sandwich for breakfast, because I was really hungry. :)

JRuud said...

Hi everyone!! Nice to meet you all :) I think writers like to rush their work; I know I'm going to take it slow for my first novel!

Please come check out my blog.

Oh, and I had a breakfast burrito. Delicious.

xo.

Gina Dickerson said...

After two busy weeks I'm late here and bringing amaretto biscuits, although I'd much rather be having amaretto liqueur!
Not had a chance to read online so far due to massive cake marathon!

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